New Resources Provide Localized Info on Safe Disposal of Used Needles and Sharps

People want to do the right thing but may not know how; national non-profit’s new web resources provide consumer-friendly, location-specific information

GLOUCESTER, Mass.--()--Millions of people with chronic conditions who use sharps, needles, lancets or auto injectors outside of a medical facility for medical treatment may have questions about how to get rid of their used sharps safely. New information and resources from NeedyMeds, a national non-profit patient education organization, at SafeNeedleDisposal.org is making it easier for people to dispose of needles safely no matter where they happen to be.

“Some locations have different sharps disposal regulations, which may require people living or traveling in those areas to take used sharps to special drop-off points. People should go to SafeNeedleDisposal.org to learn how to safely get rid of used sharps, wherever in the country they happen to be.”

Research shows that people who use needles and lancets to manage their medical conditions believe it is their responsibility to dispose of their sharps safely, but lack clear, factual information on what to do. Much of the existing information does not personalize disposal guidelines for people in every state.

“We know that people want specific, succinct information on safe sharps disposal, presented in ways that are easy to follow,” said Richard J. Sagall, MD, president of NeedyMeds. “For local guidance on disposing of sharps safely, presented in a way that is easy to understand, SafeNeedleDisposal.org is a one-stop-shop.”

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, sharps that are not disposed of properly may cause injury. In order to minimize risk and increase awareness about recommended disposal practices, SafeNeedleDisposal.org encourages visitors to click on their state or enter their ZIP code to learn about local disposal regulations and options.

According to SafeNeedleDisposal.org, the vast majority of people who use sharps can dispose of them at home. To do so, patients should place used sharps in a strong, plastic container—like a laundry detergent or bleach bottle—seal the container with duct tape and label, “DO NOT RECYCLE,” and place the sealed container in the trash, never the recycling. Patients can learn if their location allows household disposal by visiting the website.

“For most people, safe disposal is an easy 1-2-3 process: contain sharps in a strong, plastic container, seal it with duct tape and label, “DO NOT RECYCLE,” and then put it in the trash,” said Dr. Sagall. “Some locations have different sharps disposal regulations, which may require people living or traveling in those areas to take used sharps to special drop-off points. People should go to SafeNeedleDisposal.org to learn how to safely get rid of used sharps, wherever in the country they happen to be.”

About NeedyMeds

NeedyMeds, a national nonprofit, is a comprehensive and reliable source of information on assistance programs available for people having difficulties paying for their medications or healthcare. The website is visited by approximately 13,000 people each workday. NeedyMeds' information is always free, easy to access, and updated regularly. Unlike similar sites, NeedyMeds requires no registration and gathers no identifiable information on site visitors.

Contacts

NeedyMeds
Amy Martin Vogt, 202-868-4807
amartinvogt@MessagePartnersPR.com