130 Million Americans with Chronic Disease Cost More Than $2.5 Trillion Annually

CNN-YouTube debate poses opportunity to address major health care cost drivers impacting Americans and the economy

WASHINGTON--()--The Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease (PFCD) today announced the launch of an advertisement campaign highlighting the importance for the next president to address costly chronic diseases, like asthma, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease, which are crippling the U.S. health care system. With half of all American adults struggling with at least one chronic condition and almost one in three living with two or more chronic conditions, chronic diseases pose an unsustainable burden on our health care system.

“As we look to our future leaders, the PFCD calls on all voters to ask candidates how they plan to address chronic disease and advance policy solutions that will improve both personal health and the overall health of the economy.”

Active in the 2008 presidential election, the PFCD has re-engaged in the 2016 election to challenge policymakers and candidates to address the issue of chronic disease; to educate the public about the social and economic impact of chronic disease; and to mobilize Americans to call for change. PFCD is working with hundreds of partners in both the public and private sectors to highlight the impact of costly chronic diseases and to emphasize the value in prevention. In broadening the health care reform discussion to more clearly illustrate just how vital prevention is, PFCD is also eager to draw attention to the importance of innovation and the many existing programs and resources already available to help Americans achieve and sustain better overall health.

For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program helps people at risk of developing diabetes to make the changes needed to avoid diabetes altogether. Similarly, the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program empowers people already living with one or more chronic conditions to improve their health by making healthier choices, being more active, taking their medicines, and following up with their doctors when needed. Both programs generate significant savings and, most importantly, result in a better quality of life for individuals and their families. People in communities across America are benefiting from these programs, but neither is accessible to Americans everywhere.

The PFCD’s new television advertisement illustrates the social and economic impact chronic disease and issues a call to action for all candidates in the upcoming elections, especially the presidential candidates, to prioritize sustainable chronic disease solutions as their first health care objective.

“With the Democratic debate scheduled for this evening in Las Vegas, there is a significant opportunity to discuss the increasing impact of chronic disease on not just the health care system, but further, the entire economy,” stated PFCD Chairman Ken Thorpe.

“The time is now for a productive discussion to focus on the true underlying cost drivers in our health care system. Chronic diseases affect every American family, increasing costs and missed days from work and school. Without action, our economy will suffer measurably,” Thorpe continued. “As we look to our future leaders, the PFCD calls on all voters to ask candidates how they plan to address chronic disease and advance policy solutions that will improve both personal health and the overall health of the economy.”

About The Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease

The Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease (PFCD) is an internationally-recognized organization of patients, providers, community organizations, business and labor groups, and health policy experts committed to raising awareness of the number one cause of death, disability, and rising health care costs: chronic disease.

Contacts

Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease
Jennifer Burke, 301-801-9847
Jennifer.burke@fightchronicdisease.org

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